Tmic
You are using an unsupported browser. Please upgrade your browser to a newer version to get the best experience on Toxin, Toxin Target Database.
Record Information
Version2.0
Creation Date2009-03-06 18:58:06 UTC
Update Date2014-12-24 20:21:08 UTC
Accession NumberT3D0114
Identification
Common NameRadon-222
ClassSmall Molecule
DescriptionRadon is the chemical element of symbol Rn and atomic number 86. It is a rare radioactive gas, belonging to the noble gas series, and is formed as part of three radioactive decay chains that begin with uranium or thorium. Thirty-six radioactive isotopes of radon, with mass number from 193 to 228, have been characterized. The most stable isotope is Radon-222 (half-life of 3.8 days); it is generated naturally by the decay of 238U and emits alpha particles. Because of its radioactivity and unreactivity as a chemical element, radon has few uses and is seldom used in academic research. Radon is responsible for the majority of the mean public exposure to ionizing radiations. (2)
Compound Type
  • Industrial/Workplace Toxin
  • Inorganic Compound
  • Metal
  • Natural Compound
  • Non-Metal
  • Pollutant
  • Radioactive
  • Radioactive Isotope
  • Radium Compound
Chemical Structure
Thumb
Synonyms
Synonym
(222)86Rn
(222)Rn
222Rn
Radon 222
Radon, isotope of mass 222
Chemical FormulaRn
Average Molecular Mass222.018 g/mol
Monoisotopic Mass222.018 g/mol
CAS Registry Number14859-67-7
IUPAC Name(²²²Rn)radon
Traditional Name(²²²Rn)radon
SMILES[222Rn]
InChI IdentifierInChI=1S/Rn/i1+0
InChI KeyInChIKey=SYUHGPGVQRZVTB-IGMARMGPSA-N
Chemical Taxonomy
Description belongs to the class of inorganic compounds known as homogeneous noble gases. These are inorganic non-metallic compounds in which the largest atom is a halogen atom.
KingdomInorganic compounds
Super ClassHomogeneous non-metal compounds
ClassHomogeneous noble gases
Sub ClassNot Available
Direct ParentHomogeneous noble gases
Alternative ParentsNot Available
Substituents
  • Homogeneous noble gas
Molecular FrameworkNot Available
External Descriptors
Biological Properties
StatusDetected and Not Quantified
OriginExogenous
Cellular Locations
  • Cytoplasm
  • Extracellular
Biofluid LocationsNot Available
Tissue LocationsNot Available
PathwaysNot Available
ApplicationsNot Available
Biological RolesNot Available
Chemical RolesNot Available
Physical Properties
StateGas
AppearanceColorless, odorless gas
Experimental Properties
PropertyValue
Melting PointNot Available
Boiling PointNot Available
SolubilityNot Available
LogPNot Available
Predicted Properties
PropertyValueSource
logP0ChemAxon
Physiological Charge0ChemAxon
Hydrogen Acceptor Count0ChemAxon
Hydrogen Donor Count0ChemAxon
Polar Surface Area0 ŲChemAxon
Rotatable Bond Count0ChemAxon
Refractivity0 m³·mol⁻¹ChemAxon
Polarizability1.78 ųChemAxon
Number of Rings0ChemAxon
Bioavailability1ChemAxon
Rule of FiveYesChemAxon
Ghose FilterYesChemAxon
Veber's RuleYesChemAxon
MDDR-like RuleYesChemAxon
Spectra
Spectra
Spectrum TypeDescriptionSplash Key
Predicted LC-MS/MSPredicted LC-MS/MS Spectrum - 10V, Positivesplash10-03di-0090000000-97c3beae9c7e08759e61View in MoNA
Predicted LC-MS/MSPredicted LC-MS/MS Spectrum - 20V, Positivesplash10-03di-0090000000-97c3beae9c7e08759e61View in MoNA
Predicted LC-MS/MSPredicted LC-MS/MS Spectrum - 40V, Positivesplash10-03di-0090000000-97c3beae9c7e08759e61View in MoNA
Predicted LC-MS/MSPredicted LC-MS/MS Spectrum - 10V, Negativesplash10-0a4i-0090000000-68a90cbe72f821e6bce9View in MoNA
Predicted LC-MS/MSPredicted LC-MS/MS Spectrum - 20V, Negativesplash10-0a4i-0090000000-68a90cbe72f821e6bce9View in MoNA
Predicted LC-MS/MSPredicted LC-MS/MS Spectrum - 40V, Negativesplash10-0a4i-0090000000-68a90cbe72f821e6bce9View in MoNA
Toxicity Profile
Route of ExposureOral (3); Inhalation (3) ; Dermal(3)
Mechanism of ToxicityThe ionizing radiation produced by radon causes cellular damage that includes DNA breakage, accurate or inaccurate repair, apoptosis, gene mutations, chromosomal change, and genetic instability. This leads to loss of normal cell and tissue homeostasis, and development of malignancy. Ionizing radiation that does not directly damage DNA can produce reactive oxygen intermediates that directly affect the stability of p53, an important enzyme in cell-cycle regulation, and produce oxidative damage to individual bases in DNA and point mutations by mispairing during DNA replication. (3)
MetabolismExposure to radon can occur from inhalation or dermal contact. It can also enter the body via ingestion if dissolved in water. Radon distributes mainly to the fat. It is not metabolized and may be eliminated in the urine, faeces, or expired air. (3)
Toxicity ValuesNot Available
Lethal DoseNot Available
Carcinogenicity (IARC Classification)1, carcinogenic to humans. (1)
Uses/SourcesRadon has few uses and is seldom used in academic research. Radon gas from natural sources can accumulate in buildings, especially in confined areas such as basements. Radon can be found in some spring waters and hot springs. (2)
Minimum Risk LevelNot Available
Health EffectsRadon is responsible for the majority of the mean public exposure to ionizing radiations. Due to it's radioactivity, breathing high concentrations of radon can cause lung cancer. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, radon could be the second most frequent cause of lung cancer, after cigarette smoking; and radon-induced lung cancer the 6th leading cause of cancer death overall, causing 21,000 lung cancer deaths per year in the United States. (2)
SymptomsExposure to high doses of ionizing radiation results in acute radiation syndrome, which can cause skin burns, hair loss, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, disorientation, low blood pressure, headache, fatigue, weakness, fever, birth defects, illness, infection, and death. (4, 5)
TreatmentTreatment reversing the effects of irradiation is currently not possible. Anaesthetics and antiemetics are administered to counter the symptoms of exposure, as well as antibiotics for countering secondary infections due to the resulting immune system deficiency. (5)
Normal Concentrations
Not Available
Abnormal Concentrations
Not Available
DrugBank IDNot Available
HMDB IDNot Available
PubChem Compound ID61773
ChEMBL IDNot Available
ChemSpider ID55661
KEGG IDC16454
UniProt IDNot Available
OMIM ID
ChEBI ID33492
BioCyc IDNot Available
CTD IDNot Available
Stitch IDRadon-222
PDB IDNot Available
ACToR ID6527
Wikipedia LinkNot Available
References
Synthesis ReferenceNot Available
MSDSNot Available
General References
  1. International Agency for Research on Cancer (2014). IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. [Link]
  2. Wikipedia. Radon. Last Updated 5 July 2009. [Link]
  3. ATSDR - Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (2008). Toxicological profile for radon. U.S. Public Health Service in collaboration with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). [Link]
  4. ATSDR - Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (1999). Toxicological profile for ionizing radiation. U.S. Public Health Service in collaboration with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). [Link]
  5. Wikipedia. Radiation poisoning. Last Updated 22 August 2009. [Link]
Gene Regulation
Up-Regulated GenesNot Available
Down-Regulated GenesNot Available

Targets

1. DNA
General Function:
Used for biological information storage.
Specific Function:
DNA contains the instructions needed for an organism to develop, survive and reproduce.
Molecular Weight:
2.15 x 1012 Da
References
  1. ATSDR - Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (2008). Toxicological profile for radon. U.S. Public Health Service in collaboration with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). [Link]